Dr. Christine

Dr. Christine

Dr. Christine serves as our full time on staff Medical Director. She specializes in population health management, as well as financial claims analysis. With her public health knowledge, she assists our clients with developing tailored and cost effective wellness programs. She also advises our actuarial and underwriting staff with clinical insights to mitigate catastrophic loss and provide data driven population management.   Dr. Christine maintains a wealth of medical knowledge and is well versed in many aspects of medical care including, but not limited to, autoimmune disease, gastrointestinal diseases, cardiovascular disease, women’s health, endocrine disorders, and neurologic and chronic disease states.   Dr. Christine holds undergraduate degrees in both chemistry and biology. She graduated from medical school in 2007. Her postgraduate training included six years of intensive training at the University of Arizona and the prestigious Mayo Clinic.   Dr. Christine has been very involved in the medical advocate role guiding patients and their family members through the complexities of our healthcare system.  Dr. Christine has also provided guidance to legal counsel as it relates to the standard of medical care.    Dr. Christine’s years in medical practice along with her dedication for quality and compassionate healthcare has led her to her current position as Medical Director for J.P. Griffin Group.
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Author's Posts

Keeping Your Wellness Program Compliant

Dr. Christine

You don’t have to be a health insurance expert to know that healthcare coverage makes up a significant portion of businesses’ operating costs. Looking ahead to next year, Willis Tower Watson predicts the average annual per-employee cost for health insurance will increase 5.3% to $12,850 (up from $12,200 in 2017). Understandably, employers are always looking for ways to get a firmer handle on rising healthcare costs and often turn to wellness programs as a possible solution.   

Three Important Federal Laws That Affect Wellness Plans

Before you launch a wellness program, it’s important to do your homework. Mistakes can be costly for both your employees and your bottom line. One area you should pay particularly close attention to is the intersection of wellness plans and federal law. There are several comprehensive federal statutes that impact workplace wellness plans, so before you put your plan in place, make sure you consult with a legal expert who can help you stay on the right side of the law.

1. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) includes nondiscrimination rules that apply to wellness plans being offered in connection with group health plans. Under HIPAA, workplace wellness programs are divided into two categories: participatory wellness programs and health-contingent wellness programs.  

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Topics: Employee Benefits, Compliance, wellness, employee wellness, wellness program

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The Effect of Chronic Conditions on Employer and Employee Healthcare Costs

Dr. Christine

It seems like the only thing we can talk about these days is the rising cost of healthcare. Whether it’s in the news or in the boardroom, healthcare costs are a major topic of conversation — and with good reason. Healthcare costs have been increasing for decades with no apparent end in sight. There are many differing opinions on how exactly to decrease costs and even more debate as to the cause behind them. What is the reasoning behind the drastic increases?

While that question may have many answers, one of the most impactful is the effect of chronic conditions, which require constant care from medical professionals. Chronic conditions range in severity and attention needed to manage them, which can dramatically affect the healthcare costs associated with them.

A recent study by the RAND Corporation, a nonprofit, nonpartisan research organization committed to making “the world safer and more secure, healthier and more prosperous,” looked into chronic conditions in the United States and their effect on healthcare costs. Their findings were both surprising and disheartening — but they do help explain at least one reason why overall costs are increasing so dramatically.

What Is a Chronic Condition?

A chronic condition is an illness that lasts for a prolonged period, but most definitions do not specify an exact period of time. For the purposes of the RAND study, they defined the term as a “physical or mental health condition that lasts more than one year and causes functional restrictions or requires ongoing monitoring or treatment.”

By this definition, we could assume that the term “chronic conditions” includes ailments such as heart disease, high blood pressure, asthma, anemia, diabetes, arthritis, cancer, and mood disorders, among many others.

What Causes (and Contributes to) Chronic Conditions?

According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control), there are four major health risk factors that “cause much of the illness, suffering, and early death related to chronic diseases and conditions.” They are:

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Topics: Employee Benefits, Cost Containment, Education

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