How To Best Reach a Digital-Savvy Workforce

David Rook

How to Best Reach a Digital-Savvy Workforce

According to a recent Gallup poll, little progress is being made by U.S. companies hoping to improve employee engagement levels. In 2015, 32 percent of employees were classified as “engaged,” based on a number of measures such as believing their opinions count at work and having the opportunity to do what they do best every day. This figure represents only a 0.5 percent increase over 2014.

The majority of workers, 50.8 percent, were classified as “not engaged,” while an alarming 17.2 percent were classified as “actively disengaged.”

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Topics: Employee Benefits, Employee Communications, Technology

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The ABCs of Employee Benefits Jargon and Acronyms

David Rook

The ABCs of Employee Benefits Jargon and Acronyms

In this, the era of “consumer-driven healthcare”, employees are expected to know more and more about healthcare in order to make well-informed decisions. But the employee benefits industry’s over-reliance on jargon and acronyms doesn’t exactly make it easy on them.

Less than a quarter of Americans (about 14%) are confident that they understand basic insurance terminology like “premiums” and “maximum out-of-pocket expense”. And of those who are insured, less than half are confident in their knowledge of insurance terminology. Even tech-savvy Millennials struggle with their understanding of insurance lingo.

Chances are very good that your employees don’t have a clue as to the difference between an HSA and HRA, let alone know the difference between a co-pay and co-insurance. To assist you with the education process, we’ve assembled a collection of more than fifty of the most frequently used insurance and employee benefits-related terms.

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Topics: Employee Benefits, Education, Employee Communications

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Four Tips for Taming Runaway Emergency Room (ER) Expenditures

David Rook

Four Tips for Taming Runaway Emergency Room (ER) Expenditures  

The average cost of an urgent care visit is almost 71% less than a typical visit to the emergency room ($155 vs. $583) for treatment of the same illness or injury. (It’s also cheaper than a typical primary care visit, albeit not by much ($155 vs. $165.) In another study in 2013, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) showed the median cost of an emergency room visit was $1,233, though in some localities it rose as high as $2,168.

With such a dramatic difference in the cost of care by facility, employers have a vested interest in making sure their employees know when they should use Urgent Care vs. the ER vs. calling 911 or an ambulance. But that’s simply not happening.
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Topics: Employee Benefits, Cost Containment, Education, Employee Communications

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Preventative Care: A Win-Win For Employers And Employees

David Rook

Preventative Care: A Win-Win For Employers And Employees


When it comes to taming employer-sponsored healthcare costs, virtually nothing tops a workforce that takes advantage of fully covered preventative care benefits and age appropriate screenings. Unfortunately, current estimates indicate that Americans use preventive services at about half the recommended rate. There are a variety of reasons for this, but perhaps the largest reason involves a misconception about what constitutes covered preventive care.
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Topics: Employee Benefits, Cost Containment, Education, Employee Communications

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